BCBAs Soon Not Being Certified Outside U.S.: What Certification Now?

A number of countries who relied on BCBAs for treatment for autism and other related disorders will have to find another alternative.

This article explores the prevalence of autism worldwide, the lack of diagnosis and treatment options in many countries, and why the BACB decided to make the decision. The next article focuses more on what these countries can do if they are looking for alternatives. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Hospitals + Providers: How to Effectively Communicate With and Treat Autistic Patients

By Anita Lesko, BSN, RN, MS, CRNA, CAS (and proudly on the autism spectrum)

Currently, 1 in 44 children in the US are diagnosed with autism, with many more children and adults being missed or receiving a diagnosis later in life as adults. This means a high percentage of individuals bring seen in hospitals, pediatrician or primary care offices, emergency rooms, and other healthcare settings have sensory and communication differences that need to be understood and addressed by providers. 

Lack of specific training and knowledge in the healthcare field is constantly leading to people with autism not being diagnosed or treated properly as well as often avoidable situations that impede timely or effective care. The experience of a person with autism starts when they arrive at your facility and first get to intake, so the importance of training does not stop with the medical staff. It actually starts with the non-medical staff in intake, as often times overwhelm can start before the person with autism has even seen their healthcare provider, adding sometimes insurmountable challenges to effective care. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Emergency Departments: Avoid the Service Guarantee Trap

The most common complaint about a trip to the emergency room (ER) is usually that the wait time at the ER was far too long.

Some emergency departments (EDs) have jumped on the bandwagon of offering service guarantees: unless a patient receives care in a certain amount of time, it’s free.

While at first glance this can seem like a strategic business move and simple solution to the consumer’s problem, service guarantees can actually pose serious challenges to EDs that could end up hurting their reputation and credibility. Many emergency departments have found that they did get an increase in patients, but due to systemic challenges in serving those patients it was actually detrimental to the department as a whole. Read more to find out how. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Patients with Autism and COVID-19 Present Unique Challenges for Healthcare Providers, Especially in the Emergency Room

The recent Coronavirus Pandemic has increased stress created uncertain times for all of us but let’s not forget the 1:44 children who are diagnosed with autism and other cognitive disorders every year.  Families of children with autism learn early how to anticipate and manage a crisis.  But when the crisis involves emergency medical services or a trip to a hospital emergency room, it often takes a well-informed treatment team and caregivers to keep the situation under control.  The sights, sounds, smells, and accelerated pace of hospital emergency services can overwhelm the senses of an individual with autism. The following suggestions are prepared for emergency treatment teams, hospital clinicians, and the families of individuals with autism. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Autism Certification for Speech Language Pathologists: Why it’s Important

Autism certification for speech language pathologists (SLPs) is increasingly important due to the rising numbers of neurodiverse individuals many SLPs have to work with on a daily basis.

Neurodiverse SLP Education is Highly Variable

While there may be some time devoted to how neurodiverse individuals process and how they can best be taught, this is going to vary substantially based on the training of the individual SLP.

Typically, SLPs choose to specialize in different areas, but their main role is to help patients develop effective communication and social skills.

Without asking the SLP, it is generally hard for people to tell how much knowledge and experience they have with neurodiverse individuals unless they have a recognized certification. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Why Occupational Therapists Should Get Certified in Autism

Many Occupational Therapists don’t receive specific training in the areas of autism or other cognitive disorders to help them adapt to the range of challenges Autism Spectrum Disorder can present. Occupational therapists are expected to be highly qualified and capable of working with a wide range of conditions and diverse populations.

The problem is that students with autism and other cognitive disorders don’t typically respond the same to traditional practices, so understanding these differences can be crucial in delivering effective care to these individuals.

Standards for medical professionals are constantly being raised. The combination of these two aspects is why it’s becoming increasingly important for OTs to find ways to differentiate their skill set from others in the industry, helping them gain a competitive edge and to be a top care provider.

Over 3.5 million Americans are living with autism and 1 in every 44 children are diagnosed with the condition. This is a huge population that demands professional care – OTs can be on the front lines of serving them while expanding their market and increasing business opportunities. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

9 Ways an Autism Certification Helps Occupational Therapists (& Children)

Occupational therapists don’t always receive in-depth training specific to autism and other cognitive disorders throughout their education, which is why autism certification can be so helpful for many OTs.

Many occupational therapists became an OT because they want to be able to help children. A CAS credential is meant to help OTs and other health care professionals be better prepared to serve individuals on the autism spectrum in a variety of ways, in turn making them a resource for teachers, parents, and co-workers alike. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Add to Your Practice as a Special Needs Dentist: Autism Certification

By Dr. Yasmin Kottait, DDS, HDD, Dip CBT, MFDS Ed, MSc

Becoming a Certified Autism Center shows parents that you can be their dentist, whether their child has autism or another cognitive disorder or special need. This can help your dental practice grow and distinguish yourself as a leader.

Autism Spectrum and Dentistry

Wondering how to advance your career in service of children with autism? If you’re thinking of more ways to serve this amazing group of children as a Pediatric Dentist, here is what you need to know.

Continue Reading →

Share:
0
Page 3 of 3 123