Executive Function

Stroke: When the system fails for the second time
March 23, 2020
After a stroke, there is an increased risk of suffering a second one. If areas in the left hemisphere were affected during the first attack, language is often impaired. In order to maintain this capability, the brain usually briefly drives up the counterparts on the right side. But what happens a...
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Ritalin and similar medications cause brain to focus on benefits of work, not costs
March 19, 2020
Common assumption has long held that Ritalin, Adderall and similar drugs work by helping people focus.
Yet a new study from a team led in part by Brown University researchers shows that these medications -- usually prescribed to individuals diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivi...
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Researchers find key to keep working memory working
March 19, 2020
Working memory, the ability to hold a thought in mind even through distraction, is the foundation of abstract reasoning and a defining characteristic of the human brain. It is also impaired in disorders such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.
Now Yale researchers have found a k...
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Seductive details inhibit learning
March 19, 2020
When teachers use a funny joke, a cat video or even background music in their lessons, it can keep students from understanding the main content.
These so-called "seductive details," information that is interesting but irrelevant, can be detrimental to learning, according to a meta-ana...
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Could disease pathogens be the dark matter behind Alzheimer's disease?
March 18, 2020
For researchers investigating Alzheimer's Disease (AD), a devastating neurodegenerative illness afflicting close to 6 million Americans, it is the best and worst of times.
Scientists have made exponential advances in understanding many aspects of the mysterious disease since it was fi...
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A new window into psychosis
March 18, 2020
A recent study in mice led a team of researchers in Japan to believe that psychosis may be caused by problems with specialized nerve cells deep within the brain, as well as a certain kind of learning behavior. The researchers hope this could provide insight into the emergence of delusions in pati...
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Alzheimer risk genes converge on microglia
March 18, 2020
Our DNA determines a large part of our risk for Alzheimer's disease, but it remained unclear how many genetic risk factors contribute to disease. A team led by Prof. Bart De Strooper (VIB-KU Leuven) and Dr. Mark Fiers now show that many of risk factors affect brain maintenance cells called microg...
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Brain-doping produced by your own body
March 13, 2020
Erythropoietin, or Epo for short, is a notorious doping agent. It promotes the formation of red blood cells, leading thereby to enhanced physical performance -- at least, that is what we have believed until now. However, as a growth factor, it also protects and regenerates nerve cells in the brai...
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Brief entrance test can predict academic success within first year of study in economics
March 13, 2020
German researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin found that even a short test can reliably predict students' success within their first year of study in Economics -- much better than an intelligence test or predictions based on school grades....
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Gold nanoparticles uncover amyloid fibrils
March 12, 2020
One of the characteristics of Alzheimer's disease is the presence of knot-like structures between brain cells. These are called "amyloid fibrils" and are formed by the notorious amyloid beta peptide and Tau protein, which are two of the most sought-after targets for the development of therapies t...
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