Research

A year of advancing novel regenerative biotherapeutics toward patient care
January 27, 2024
Mayo Clinic's Center for Regenerative Biotherapeutics has advanced the development and biomanufacturing of novel therapeutics, called biologics, for cancer and inflammatory conditions into clinical trials. "My dream has been to develop innovative technologies that go beyond treating symptoms ...
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Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center highlights research advances in 2023
January 27, 2024
ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic researchers make new discoveries, develop first-of-its-kind tools and technologies and constantly improve upon existing ones with the goal to provide the best in healthcare. The following five stories are a round-up of some of the most significant medical resear...
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Researchers map how measles virus spreads in human brain
January 13, 2024
ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic researchers mapped how the measles virus mutated and spread in the brain of a person who succumbed to a rare, lethal brain disease. New cases of this disease, which is a complication of the measles virus, may occur as measles reemerges among the unvaccinated, sa...
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Minnesota Partnership awards five collaborative research grants for 2023
January 13, 2024
The Minnesota Partnership for Biotechnology and Medical Genomics (MNP) has announced its five research awardees for 2023. MNP is funded by the State of Minnesota and provides support for innovative research conducted by collaborative teams from the University of Minnesota and Mayo Clinic. Total...
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Mayo Clinic names new Research leader
January 11, 2024
Vijay Shah, M.D. ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic has announced the appointment of Vijay Shah, M.D., as Kinney Executive Dean of Research. He succeeds Gregory Gores, M.D., who has served in the position for 10 years. Dr. Shah, a consultant with joint appointments in Gastroenterology and Hepatol...
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Shortened telomeres heighten risk of serious lung disease
January 11, 2024
The 46 human chromosomes are shown in blue, with the telomeres appearing as white pinpoints. The DNA has already been copied, so each chromosome is made up of two identical lengths of DNA, each with its own two telomeres. Credit: Hesed Padilla-Nash and Thomas Ried, National Cancer Institute, N...
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Researchers make unexpected discovery in how pancreatic cancer spreads
January 10, 2024
In this confocal microscopy image, the lysosomal protein called LAMP1 is stained green and surrounds a blue-stained pancreatic cancer cell nucleus. How cancer spreads or metastasizes is a big question for cancer researchers and patients. Mayo Clinic researchers studying pancreatic cancer — ...
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Use of anticoagulant drug after aortic valve replacement lowers mortality risk, Mayo Clinic study finds
December 14, 2023
ROCHESTER, Minn. — Patients who received the anticoagulant drug warfarin after bioprosthetic aortic valve replacement had lower incidence of mortality and a decreased risk of blood clots, according to a retrospective study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The use of bioprosthetic aortic ...
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Health and zombie cells in aging
December 6, 2023
With age, cells can experience senescence, a state where they stop growing but continue releasing inflammatory and tissue-degrading molecules. When a person is young, the immune system responds and eliminates senescent cells, often referred to as zombie cells. However, zombie cells linger and c...
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Identifying new potential in cancer-killing T cells
December 6, 2023
When Joanina Gicobi began her Ph.D. degree five years ago at Mayo Clinic Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, she was interested in thinking creatively about ways to improve cancer treatment. In particular, she was curious about the body's natural ability to fight tumors: Could that process...
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Electric barrier-induced voluntary abstinence reduces alcohol seeking in male, but not female, iP rats.
Maintaining abstinence and preventing relapse are key to the successful recovery from alcohol use disorder. There are two main ways individuals with alcohol use disorder abstain from alcohol use: forced (e.g., incarceration) and voluntary. Voluntary abstinence is often evoked due to the negative consequences associated with excessive alcohol consumption. This study investigated relapse-like behavior to alcohol seeking following acute, forced, and voluntary abstinence. Male rats had increased operant self-administration responding throughout training compared to females; however, females consumed greater amounts of alcohol in g/kg. Both male and female rats achieved voluntary abstinence, whic...
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Can the resting state peak alpha frequency explain the relationship between temporal resolution power and psychometric intelligence?
The temporal resolution power (TRP) hypothesis states that individuals with higher TRP, as reflected by a higher performance on several psychophysical timing tasks, perform better on intelligence tests due to their ability to process information faster and coordinate their mental operations more effectively. It is proposed that these differences in TRP are related to the rate of a master clock based on neural oscillations. The present study aimed to investigate whether the peak alpha frequency (PAF) measured via electroencephalography (EEG) reflects a psychophysiological measure of this rate and its potential role in explaining the relationship between TRP and psychometric intelligence. A sa...
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Kamin blocking is disrupted by low-dose ketamine in mice: Further implications for aberrant stimulus processing in schizophrenia.
Previous studies have shown that low doses of ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, produce aberrantly strong internal representations of associatively activated but absent stimuli in humans and nonhuman animals, suggesting the validity of ketamine treatment as a preclinical model of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, including hallucinations and delusions. However, whether acute ketamine treatment also impairs the ability to ignore present but informationally redundant stimuli, which is another hallmark of schizophrenia, remains unclear. Accordingly, the present study investigated whether injections of low-dose ketamine attenuate Kamin blocking in an appetitive conditi...
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Predictions about reward outcomes in rhesus monkeys.
Human infants and nonhuman animals respond to surprising events by looking longer at unexpected than expected situations. These looking responses provide core cognitive evidence that nonverbal minds make predictions about possible outcomes and detect when these predictions fail to match reality. We propose that this phenomenon has crucial parallels with the processes of reward prediction error, indexing the difference between expected and actual reward outcomes. Most work on reward prediction errors to date involves neurobiological techniques that cannot be implemented in many relevant populations, so we developed a novel behavioral task to assess monkeys’ predictions about reward outcomes...
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Morphine exposure during adolescence induces enduring social changes dependent on adolescent stage of exposure, sex, and social test.
Drug exposure during adolescence, when the “reward” circuitry of the brain is developing, can permanently impact reward-related behavior into adulthood. Epidemiological studies show that opioid treatment during adolescence, such as pain management for a dental procedure or surgery, increases the incidence of psychiatric illness including substance use disorders. Moreover, the opioid epidemic currently in the United States is affecting younger individuals raising the impetus to understand the pathogenesis of the negative effects of opioids. One reward-related behavior that develops during adolescence is social behavior. We previously demonstrated that developmental changes in the nucleus ...
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