Autism in the Workforce: Companies Hiring People with Autism

As the number of people diagnosed with autism increases it is becoming imperative for companies to understand how hiring these individuals can provide unparalleled value. 1 in 59 children are diagnosed with autism. This leads to a very large population of adults on the spectrum who want to enter the workforce, but often struggle finding opportunities.

Individuals with autism are breaking stereotypes and showing the world what they are capable of across many arenas. Innovative companies are realizing that there are many job positions that make use of the unique strengths that people with autism possess. In fact, many times individuals on the spectrum are a better fit for certain positions than those not on the spectrum. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

How Individuals With Autism Can Provide Solutions for Companies

As businesses grow and evolve they are beginning to understand the importance of hiring employees who think differently and approach situations in ways one might consider out-of-the-box.

These neurodiverse individuals include people on the autism spectrum who possess skills that are in high demand, but are often hard to come by. It’s time we start paying attention to the undeniable value neurodiverse people provide to companies all over the world.

What is Neurodiversity?

The term neurodiversity is a concept that “considers the range of differences in human brain function and behavioral traits as normal variations.” Many times, this term refers to autism, but it can also include other cognitive disorders and disabilities.   Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Neurodiversity Training for the Workplace: How can it Help Your Company?

As autism spectrum disorder (ASD) becomes increasingly prevalent, it is important for companies to understand how people with autism can be a true asset to an organization. Hiring and creating a functional workspace for individuals with diverse talents and needs can help organizations reach their business goals, create a healthier and more inclusive workplace, and provides more opportunity for individuals with ASD to contribute their talents and skills in a meaningful way.

Paul Shattuck, an associate professor of health management and policy at Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health and director of the Life Course Outcomes Research Program at the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute, recalls when autism was almost unheard of:

“It’s big news. Twenty years ago when I started in this field, autism was a condition that few people had heard of unless they had seen the movie Rain Man. But since the diagnostic criteria for autism have changed, we now include more people under that umbrella term than ever before.” -Paul Shattuck

Continue Reading →

Share:
0