IBCCES Announces New Advisory Board Members

The International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES) is welcoming 3 new members to its Advisory Board. IBCCES is based in Jacksonville, FL, but works in all 50 states and 42 countries to provide certification and training programs in cognitive disorders such as autism, ADHD, and other special needs to education, healthcare and corporate professionals.

“We work hard to ensure we have leaders in a variety of specialties and backgrounds present on our board, including neurologists, special education experts, clinicians, and individuals on the autism spectrum. We’re so excited to announce these 3 additions to our board – we know they will bring a wealth of knowledge to our programs so we can continue to impact the lives of those with cognitive disorders,” said Myron Pincomb, Board Chairman.

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ADHD prevalence increasing around the globe

Over the last 20 years, the prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has increased significantly in the United States; from 6.1% to 10.2%. Countries around the globe are noticing a similar increase as well. According to Department of Health, about 6.4% of children and adolescents are affected by the disorder in Hong Kong, with over 10k new cases in 2017 alone. Dr Patrick Ip, clinical associate professor at HKU’s department of pediatrics and adolescent medicine, attributed the “phenomenon” to more accurate diagnosis and growing awareness about the importance of treatment.*

It’s incredibly important to ensure professionals working with individuals with ADHD and other cognitive disorders are provided opportunities to receive up-to-date focused training options. The Board Certified Cognitive Specialist program includes training on ADHD as well as autism, dyslexia and other related cognitive disorders. Equip yourself with a professional credential backed by relevant training to ensure you’re providing the best quality services for those living with cognitive disorders.

 

 

*Source

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VillaKey Designated A Certified Autism Center

VillaKey has completed the process of becoming a Certified Autism Center, which is a designation that demonstrates the organization’s commitment to ensuring their clients who have autism or sensory sensitivities will have the best possible experience. This is the first vacation rental company globally to earn the CAC designation.

VillaKey has helped families, many with children on the autism spectrum, book vacation home rentals for years, but they furthered their commitment to serving those clients by completing the CAC program, which includes evidence-based staff training, through the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES). As a Certified Autism Center, parents can rest assured when booking through VillaKey that their needs will be understood and VillaKey’s experts will guide them to the best option for their family.

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Taking the Pain our of Homework for Children with Autism, ADHD, and Other Disorders

by Emily Graham, MightyMoms.net

Research has shown that children perform better in school when parents take an interest in homework. It’s important parental behavior because it shows kids that homework is important and that it should be a priority. It is especially important for children with cognitive disorders such as anxiety, autism, and ADHD, as parental involvement is one of the best ways to help children succeed in school.

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Children’s Museum of Houston Designated a Certified Autism Center

Parents with children on the autism spectrum or individuals with sensory sensitivities often find choosing destinations and attractions to visit a challenge – The Children’s Museum of Houston is working to ensure this is not the case when guests visit its location. The Museum was recently designated a Certified Autism Center, which is awarded by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES) and demonstrates a commitment to ongoing training and a formal certification process in order to better serve individuals on the autism spectrum.

“The Children’s Museum of Houston’s vision is to spark a passion for lifelong learning in all children.  We know every child is unique in their learning styles and have always strived to be an institution of inclusion.  As a result, the Children’s Museum of Houston has created an environment which allows all children to discover their interest and engage in developmentally appropriate play.  That philosophy influences our physical environment, attitudes, expectations and opportunities for all children, regardless of disability,” said Vandolyn Esparza, Alexander Specialist for Early Literacy and Special Learning Needs at Children’s Museum of Houston.

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Colebrookdale Railroad Becomes Certified Autism Center

Colebrookdale Railroad has completed the process of becoming a Certified Autism Center, which is a designation that demonstrates the organization’s commitment to ensuring guests and families with children who have autism and sensory disorders have the best possible experience. Stretching between Berks and Montgomery Counties, the Colebrookdale Railroad traverses the Secret Valley, one of the most scenic and historic regions in the northeast.

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Reading Public Museum Designated a Certified Autism Center

FIRST MUSEUM IN PENNSYLVANIA TO BECOME A CAC

The Reading Public Museum was recently designated a Certified Autism Center, which is awarded by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES) and demonstrates a commitment to an ongoing training and certification process in order to better serve individuals on the autism spectrum. Parents with children on the autism spectrum often find choosing destinations and attractions to visit a challenge due to sensory sensitivities and safety concerns. The Reading Public Museum (RPM) is the first destination to become a Certified Autism Center (CAC) in Berks County and the first museum certified in Pennsylvania. This means that visitors and families with children who have autism and other sensory disorders can enjoy the best possible experience close to home.

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Wild Styles Children’s Hair Salon Is Now A Certified Autism Center

Wild Styles Children’s Hair Salon, located in Pennsylvania, has completed the process of becoming a Certified Autism Center, which is a designation that demonstrates the organization’s commitment to ensuring their clients who have autism or sensory sensitivities will have the best possible experience. This is the first organization of its kind to earn the CAC designation.

Wild Styles’ staff have served many children on the spectrum over the last two and a half years, but they formalized their commitment to serving those clients by completing the CAC program, which includes evidence-based staff training, through the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES). As a Certified Autism Center, parents can rest assured the staff and stylists at Wild Styles are prepared to welcome everyone, regardless of their needs.

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Afraid of the Dentist? Six Tips for Parents of Children with Anxiety or Sensory Sensitivities

For any child, the world is filled with a plethora of possible sensory challenges, ranging from lights to sounds, textures, smells, and tastes. The dental office is no exception, especially for kids with dental anxiety or those who are on the autism spectrum.

So, how do you help your child to cope with all of the stimuli he will face during his upcoming dental appointment? After all, just because a fear of the dentist is not uncommon doesn’t mean you want your child to possess this fear.

Here are six ways you can help your child to not just survive his next dental appointment but thrive during it.

  1. Call Ahead

Before you take your child to the dentist, it’s a good idea to call ahead to discuss his needs with the dental staff there. The more information you have about the office’s practices, the more comfortable both you and your child will be. Also, schedule your child’s dental appointment at the particular time of day—morning or afternoon—that typically works best for him.

  1. Schedule Some “Happy Visits”

Before you take your child to his actual dental appointment, why not take him on a few “fun” trips to the dentist, known as “happy visits”? These visits will enable your child to check out the dental office environment, get a feel for the patient chair, and even allow the dental hygienist to count his teeth. The purpose of these visits is to desensitize your child to the dental office experience. It will also give you an idea of what challenges you may face during the real visit.

  1. Lean Back

During the dental appointment, ask the dental staff to lean your child’s chair back before he gets into it. This is a critical step, as sometimes children with neurobehavioral conditions don’t enjoy the feeling of moving backward.

  1. Give Your Child a Heavy Work Task and Sunglasses

Giving your child a task prior to and following his dental visit may help to keep him calm. For instance, stretching therapy bands with the hands may help to soothe your child. In addition, note that a dental office’s lighting will probably be uncomfortably bright. Therefore, consider allowing your child to wear sunglasses during his appointment.

  1. Use the Tell-Show-Do Method

The tell-show-do method is a convenient shorthand method of explaining to your child what his dental appointment will entail. For instance, first, you can verbally tell your child what he will do during the appointment. Second, you can show your child the tools that will be used during his appointment and even let him touch these tools, if possible. Finally, you can allow your child to complete his appointment. A little verbal preparation followed by a physical demonstration can go a long way in helping to eliminate some of your child’s uncertainty about his upcoming dental appointment.

  1. Be Cognizant of Time

Ask your child’s dental hygienist to let him know how long certain steps of the procedure will take as well. For instance, maybe the hygienist can say that a particular process will be finished by the time your child counts to 10. This will make your child feel more in control and minimize surprises during the appointment.

 

A trip to the dentist can be a challenging experience for many children, especially those with anxiety. However, if you follow these tips you can help ensure that your child establishes a healthy relationship with the dentist –– and in turn, is set down a path of a lifetime of healthy oral hygiene.

 

Author Bio: Dr. Steven DeLisle is a pediatric dentist who specializes in sedation dentistry and has experience treating children with special needs. He is the founder of Children’s Dentistry in Las Vegas, one of the fastest growing pediatric dental practices in the country.

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