Appalachian Valley Autism Center Has Earned the Certified Autism Center ™ Designation

Appalachian Valley Autism Center (The AVA Center) has been designated a Certified Autism Center™ (CAC). The CAC designation is granted by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES) and is awarded to organizations at which staff have completed professional autism-specific training and certification to improve staff understanding of how to best work with these patients. Continue Reading →

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Featured Certificant: Rachel C. Morgan

Rachel C. Morgan, Ed.D.

CAS, BCTS
CEO of Adam Morgan Foundation

Having both the CAS and BCTS certifications has provided a higher credibility level to my non-profit and personal endeavors. The partnership and friendship of those at IBCCES have elevated the Adam Morgan Foundation’s supports and services within our community. IBCCES equips professionals in the field of neurodiversity with a wide range of certifications for all types of careers. What makes IBCCES different is that they engage people where they are and elevate their education to take into account innovative research and practice in the field. Continue Reading →

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LearningRx Staunton-Harrisonburg Is Now A Board Certified Cognitive Center

LearningRx Staunton Harrisonburg joins other LearningRx centers around the nation to become a Board Certified Cognitive Center (BCCC), a designation granted by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES).

The BCCC designation is awarded to organizations whose staff have completed professional training and certification on autism, ADHD, anxiety, and dyslexia in school-aged learners.

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Your Voice Matters Series: Parent’s Perspective On Challenges Her Autistic Child Faces in School

Hear from Bilyana, a mother of an autistic son, discuss her challenges and her advocacy to ensure schools and teachers could better assist her son.

Video Transcript
As a parent, my biggest concerns when a teacher doesn’t have training in autism is the environment that it sets for that autistic child. There is a concern for escalating behavior issues and frustration because there’s a lack of communication and a lack of support. Autistic children understand, they’re very intuitive. When they’re put in an environment where there’s very little patience for them. And so I find that my biggest concern is just trying to acclimate my child to an environment where somebody is standing there before them, and doesn’t doesn’t know what to do.

Video Transcript
My son goes to a school setting, which is a mix of his classes or special education and general education and getting him to that point was a real struggle because it required changing the mindset of the staff and the administration, so that they were open to the capabilities of what there was versus trying to work with their own bias and their initial expectations based on how little they really do on autism. So once we’re able to educate them and advocate for these changes, they were very surprised and impressed at how much progress and autistic child can make when you do offer them into an inclusion setting.
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