Dayton Children’s Hospital Phlebotomy Department Is Now Autism Certified

The Phlebotomy Department at Dayton Children’s Hospital is the first of its kind in the nation to earn the Certified Autism Center™ (CAC) designation, granted by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES). This designation means that the lab and child life teams had to complete a rigorous training and certification program to help them better assist autistic patients or those with other sensory sensitivities.  The CAC certification also includes an onsite review to provide support and guidance to accommodate patients with sensory needs. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

The City of Mesa Reaffirms its Commitment in Celebrating and Serving People of all Abilities

The City of Mesa is maintaining its promise to serve people of all abilities. The Mesa Parks, Recreation and Community Facilities Department has once again received the Certified Autism Center™ designation from the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES). In addition, the City is also joining the Global WeThe15 campaign, which aims to represent and transform the lives of persons with disabilities. Through this campaign, Mesa commits to removing barriers faced by persons with disabilities and promote respect and inclusivity.   In 2019 the City of Mesa department became the first parks and recreation organization in the world to obtain the certification, which demonstrates the Mesa Parks, Recreation and Community Facilities Department’s commitment to ensuring guests with autism and sensory sensitivities have the best possible experience at its facilities. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Three Reasons Why Urgent Care Centers are the First Place Parents Take Their Autistic Children

Why Urgent Cares are the First Choice for Less Serious Issues

A study conducted in 2015 showed that participants deemed the ED and the way it delivered care as insufficient when it comes to meeting the unique needs of children with ASD.

There are many reasons that urgent care is preferred over the ED for less serious problems or injuries.

The wait time at an urgent care center is usually significantly less when compared to that of an ED. Typically the wait time at urgent care is less than an hour and 80 percent of patients only have to wait for 15 minutes. Compare this to EDs where the average wait time is more than 90 minutes before the patient is taken to a room for initial assessment and over two hours before most patients are discharged. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Kings Island Earns Certified Autism Center™ Designation

Kings Island becomes the latest member of the Cedar Fair Parks family to earn the Certified Autism Center™ (CAC) designation, which is granted by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES). The CAC designation demonstrates Kings Island’s dedication to providing a welcoming environment for all guests, including those with autism and other sensory disorders. The staff completed autism-specific training and certification to learn how to better communicate and assist guests with sensory needs and their family members, as well as safety concerns and protocols.

Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Greensburg Police Department Earns Certified Autism Center™ Designation

Greensburg Police Department earned the Certified Autism Center™ (CAC) designation to enhance their ability to assist the community as a whole and better understand those with autism or other sensory needs. The designation, granted by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES), is awarded to organizations whose staff have received evidence-based training and certification through IBCCES. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Urgent Care or the Emergency Room when you have Autism?

The emergency room is a stressful environment for just about everyone, especially for people on the autism spectrum. Watching the hustle and bustle of the medical staff and patients can make anyone feel on edge. Even if you’re not coping with a life-threatening emergency and are neurotypical, the atmosphere of a waiting room in the emergency ward can be overwhelming — and overstimulating. Continue Reading →

Share:
0

Autism and the Emergency Department (ED): Why it’s Important

Research shows that emergency department visits are 30 percent higher for children who have ASD and 70 percent higher for teens between 15 to 18 years old with ASD. For diagnosed adults, their ED encounters are twice as high as adults without ASD.

The emergency room (ER) is often a place of stress for most people. However, this stress skyrockets for those diagnosed with ASD.

The National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs in 2009-10 found that “caregivers of children with ASD were more likely to report difficulty utilizing services, lack of shared decision making and care coordination, and adverse family impact as compared to caregivers of children with developmental disabilities, mental health conditions, or both.”  Continue Reading →

Share:
0
Page 1 of 12 12345...»