5 Things That Helped Me When I Was Bullied As An Autistic Child

Guest Blog from Dr. Kerry Magro

When I speak in schools either as part of a school assembly or professional development, I often talk about how bullying is one of the biggest epidemics we currently have in the school systems today. Growing up with autism, I was bullied for my differences. It wouldn’t be until middle school it started to slow down for me when I went to a private school for students with learning disabilities. Now as an adult I’m an anti-bullying activist to hopefully help stop others from being bullied like I was as a kid. Continue Reading →

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Temperature Checks May Become the New Normal for Park Entry

According to recent article from FunWorld taking guest temperature could become a normal part of operations after COVID-19.

As some parks and attractions in Asia are reopening in the wake of coronavirus pandemic they have implemented guests’ temperature screening policy before allowing entry. Since fever is one of the telling symptoms of the disease, the process can help flag individuals who might have the illness. By refusing entry to those who have high temperatures, parks and attractions can potentially help prevent the spread of the disease and in-turn reassure visitors that their locations are safe. Continue Reading →

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15 Behavior Strategies for Children with Autism

Written by Rachel Wise (article republished with permission)

In this article you will find 15 supportive behavior strategies for children on the autism spectrum (some strategies can be used with adults as well). Many of the strategies can also be used to help children without autism who have challenging behaviors.When caring for or working with a child with autism, a parent, teacher, or other adult may become frustrated with the child’s behavior. Behaviors can come on suddenly, last for hours, be hard to control, or make the adult scared or embarrassed.

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15 Behavior Strategies for Children with Autism

Written by Rachel Wise (article republished with permission)

In this article you will find 15 supportive behavior strategies for children on the autism spectrum (some strategies can be used with adults as well). Many of the strategies can also be used to help children without autism who have challenging behaviors.When caring for or working with a child with autism, a parent, teacher, or other adult may become frustrated with the child’s behavior. Behaviors can come on suddenly, last for hours, be hard to control, or make the adult scared or embarrassed.

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NY Times: Rolling Out the Welcome Mat for Travelers With Autism

A growing number of theme parks, hotels and special attractions are introducing autism training and sensory guides.

 
 

The Thibault family at Rio Secreto, Playa Del Carmen, Mexico, 2017. From left, Chris, Sebastian, Tristan, Emerson and Nicole Thibault.Credit via Thibault family

By 

When Nicole Thibault had her first child, she imagined traveling everywhere with him. But by age 2, he would become upset by simply passing a restaurant that smelled of garlic. Waiting in line elicited tantrums and crowded places overwhelmed him. Autism was diagnosed within the year.

“I thought maybe our family dream of travel wouldn’t happen,” said Ms. Thibault, 46, of Fairport, N.Y., who now has three children. But she spent the next three years learning to prepare her son for travel by watching videos of future destinations and attractions so that he would know what to expect. The preparation helped enable him, now 14 and well-traveled, to enjoy adventures as challenging as exploring caves in Mexico. It also encouraged Ms. Thibault to launch a business, Magical Storybook Travels, planning travel for families with special needs.

Now the travel industry is catching up to the family. A growing number of theme parks, special attractions and hotels are introducing autism training and sensory guides that highlight triggers, providing resources in times of need and assuring families they won’t be judged.

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Bridging the Gap Between Autism & Healthcare Providers

By Anita Lesko, Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist, Autism Advocate, Author

I am a Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist for the past 27 years.  I’ve been working full time ever since graduating from Columbia University in 1988 with my Master’s in Nurse Anesthesia. I specialize in anesthesia for neurosurgery, organ transplants, and orthopedic joint replacements.

Oh, yes, there’s something else I’d like you to know!

I’m autistic, and I didn’t even know this until I was fifty, yes, 50, when I “accidentally” discovered it. 
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Student Anxiety and What Teachers Can do to Help

By: Dr. Ann Marie Leonard-Zabel, Full Professor of Psychology-Curry College, President of NEALAC Clinic

Student anxiety disorders are at an all-time high, making it increasingly important for teachers and other staff to know how to recognize and respond to students with anxiety.

Anxiety Statistics from the CDC

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 7.1% of children aged 3-17 years (approximately 4.4 million) have diagnosed anxiety. Continue Reading →

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In Autism Community Everyday Is Autism Awareness & Acceptance Day

By Dr. Kerry Magro, disability advocate, best-selling author and award-winning speaker

In 2007, the United Nations proclaimed April 2 as World Autism Awareness Day, a day every year people around the US and the world spread the word about autism whether through word of mouth or participating in events.

Sometimes people will even keep it up all April long, as for decades now April has been called different names such as National Autism Awareness Month, Autism Acceptance Month, and World Autism Month.

Once that day and month is over though there tends to be a drop off… Continue Reading →

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