Swim Angelfish is now a Certified Autism Center™

Swim Angelfish, an adaptive swim program that began in Connecticut, was recently awarded the Certified Autism Center designation by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES).

Parents with children on the autism spectrum often find selecting extracurricular activities a challenge due to sensory needs and safety concerns. By completing the training necessary to earn the Certified Autism Center (CAC) designation, Swim Angelfish has gone above and beyond their already established programming geared toward these individuals to equip themselves with even more knowledge and best practices to ensure children with autism and other sensory disorders will enjoy the best possible experience that caters to their needs. Continue Reading →

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Four Points by Sheraton Mesa Receives Certified Autism Center™ Designation

Four Points by Sheraton at Phoenix Mesa Gateway Airport is looking toward a future of inclusivity. Its staff recently completed  a professional training and certification program through the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES), designating the space as a Certified Autism Center™ (CAC). Choosing travel options can be a challenge for individuals and families who have sensory needs or are on the autism spectrum. The CAC designation means that all guests can enjoy the best possible experience that caters to their needs.

Four Points by Sheraton at Phoenix Mesa Gateway Airport also joins a growing number of organizations becoming certified in Arizona, a movement inspired by the work of the Visit Mesa organization and that community’s goal to become the most autism inclusive in the world. Continue Reading →

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First Dive Shop in Asia to Earn the Certified Autism Center™ Designation

Marshall Scuba Swim and Safety has become the first dive shop in Asia to earn the designation of Certified Autism Center™ (CAC). The CAC designation, granted by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES), means that visitors and families with children who are on the autism spectrum can enjoy the best possible experience that caters to their needs when they’re learning to dive.

Marshall Scuba Swim and Safety is in Malaysia, only ten minutes from the border with Singapore. Achieving this designation complements the long-standing efforts of Marshall’s owner and main instructor, Kenneth Tuttle. Kenneth has taught swimming for over three decades. Marshall Scuba and Swim Safety offers all levels of scuba instruction, along with instructor training to work with students on the autism spectrum as well as those with other cognitive and physical disabilities.

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House of Refuge Becomes Certified Autism Center

House of Refuge is joining the Mesa Autism Initiative, connecting to an expanding network of organizations that have earned the Certified Autism Center (CAC) designation from the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES).  A faith-based, 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, House of Refuge has been helping families experiencing homelessness in the East Valley for over 20 years by providing transitional housing and wrap-around support services. These services, coupled with the stability provided by housing, provide families with the foundation and resources needed to achieve self-sufficiency and obtain permanent housing.

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What it Means to be “Bad” – The Challenge of Special Needs and Criminal Arrest

By Carol S. Weinman, Esq., C.A.S., International Speaker and Author

“My son really is a good boy. And, now, he thinks he’s bad.” These were the words of a mom who recently witnessed her adult son – with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) – in handcuffs.  It got me thinking even more about the unspoken fallout of an ASD individual’s encounter with police. Boys with ASD experience “hits” to their self esteem at a very early age. They feel different, sometimes odd, and often ostracized and misunderstood. Highly vulnerable from a young age, they are more susceptible to the after effects of being arrested, handcuffed or fingerprinted. They transition to adulthood with a compromised sense of self-esteem and self-concept. The impact of being arrested and handcuffed cannot be minimized. It is traumatic for anyone at any age, but for an individual with ASD, it can be even more devastating.

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